Death and Donuts: Does eating Sugar increase your cancer or health risk?

Not really sure why I came up with the title Death and Donuts. I guess it was because a good friend of mine recently passed away this week and she used to eat lots of sugar. She enjoyed sweets, donuts and sugary treats. She died of cancer but it got me to thinking if enjoying a Dunkin Donuts Donut or a Krispy Kreme Donut here or a sugary sweet treat there is actually bad for you. I decided to do some research on the issue and this is what I found.  

Amber Isley of the Mayo Clinic answered the question about sugar and cancer in this Chicago Tribune article. She states “Sugar alone doesn’t cause cancer. Eating too much sugar, though, can lead to other conditions associated with an increased risk of cancer. If you’re trying to reduce your cancer risk, the best strategy is to make healthy lifestyle choices, including limiting sugar consumption.”

Simple healthy lifestyle choices we make today can help us protect our health tomorrow. I guess moderation is the key. You can enjoy the Krispy Kreme or Dunkin Donuts Donut as long as you balance that with healthy food choices.

I for one will continue to feed my family high antioxidant foods including Xocai Cold Pressed Chocolate which is packed with the antioxidant sand flavonoids we need.

I am Lynette Henk, Healthy Chocolate lover. Please feel free to contact me at (877) 208-8172 or at lynette @ liveforchocolate.com. You can also order Xocai Healthy Chocolate products on sale 20% off and with Free Shipping at ColdPressedChocolate.com.

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One Response to Death and Donuts: Does eating Sugar increase your cancer or health risk?

  1. Liz says:

    I think excessive amount of anything could cause health problems.

    Found more information about sugar and cancer here. “Oftentimes, when complex research is communicated to the public, simplistic terms are used to describe intricate details understood by only those working in the research area. Headlines like “cancer needs sugar to grow” or advice like “cancer patients should avoid sugar” are misunderstood and easily misinterpreted by the public.”

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